Elixir

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Elixir is a dynamic, functional language designed for building scalable and maintainable applications. Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain.
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Track mentors

47 Mentors

Our mentors are friendly, experienced Elixir developers who will help teach you new techniques and tricks.
Track students

11,447 Students

Join thousands of students who have enjoyed learning and improving their skills by taking this track.
Track exercises

92 Exercises

Hundreds of hours have gone into making these exercises fun, useful, and challenging to help you enjoy learning.

About Elixir

defmodule HelloWorld do

  @doc """
  Greets the user by name, or by saying
  "Hello, World!" if no name is given
  """
  def hello(name \\ "World") do
    "Hello, #{name}!"
  end
end

Elixir, initially released in 2012, extends upon the already robust features of Erlang while also being easier for beginners to access, read, test, and write.

José Valim, the creator of Elixir, explains here how he built the language for applications to be:

  1. Distributed
  2. Fault-Tolerant
  3. Soft-Real-Time
  4. Hot-Code-Swapped (can introduce new code without stopping the server)

Elixir actually compiles down to bytecode and then runs on the BEAM Erlang Virtual Machine.

There is no "conversion cost" for calling Erlang, meaning you can run Erlang code right next to Elixir code.

Being a functional language, everything in Elixir is an expression.

Elixir has "First Class Documentation" meaning comments can be attached to a function, making it easier to retrieve.

Regular expressions are also given first class treatment, removing awkward escaping within strings.

Elixir's asynchronous communication implementation allows the code to be lightweight, yet incorporate high-volume concurrency.

Programmers use Elixir to handle thousands of requests and responses concurrently on a single server node.

It has been used successfully for microservices that need to consume and serve a multitude of APIs rapidly.

The Phoenix framework helps structure Elixir applications for the web.

Join the Elixir track

Self-contained finite problems with which to learn the language

I have spent time with the Clojure, Elixir & Go tracks and all have been incredibly beneficial, providing self-contained finite problems with which to learn the language. The Go language track has been wonderful in introducing me to the language, what idiomatic code is, and the many different ways in which one can solve a problem.

Relaxed. Encouraging. Supportive.

Meet the Elixir Track mentors

Once you join the Elixir language track, you will receive support and feedback from our team of mentors. Here are the bios of a few of the mentors of this track.

Avatar of Yiming Chen

Yiming Chen https://github.com/dsdshcym

I love Elixir because I believe it can provide both dynamic polymorphism and referential transparency, which are both fundamental for writing clean code.
Avatar of Sven Steinbauer

Sven Steinbauer https://github.com/Svenito

I'm a C++ and Python developer and am in the process of learning Elxir. I always feel that teaching is a great way to learn.
Avatar of Juan Pablo Lorenzo

Juan Pablo Lorenzo GitHub

Elixir was my first step in functional programming and since I started I am very surprised with this language, its community and the incredible capabilities that Elixir has to improve software development.
Avatar of Fabian Zitter

Fabian Zitter https://github.com/Ninigi

I started using elixir around 2016 and we have been using it in our company since 2017. I love the language for how well it translates what I want to do into code.
Avatar of Tonći Galić

Tonći Galić https://github.com/Tuxified

[:polyglot, :rower, :beerlover, :father] |> Stream.cycle
Avatar of Brian Underwood

Brian Underwood https://github.com/cheerfulstoic

I'm a long-time full-stack web developer with a particular interest in different ways to store and process data. I'm a huge fan how Elixir makes functional programming and fault tolerance accessible and am excited to help others.
Fun. Challenging. Interesting

Community-sourced Elixir exercises

These are a few of the 92 exercises on the Elixir track. You can see all the exercises here.

Custom Set
medium
collections
enumeration
Simple Cipher
easy
encryption
string processing
Difference Of Squares
medium
reduce
math
Dominoes
medium
algorithms
enumerations
recursion
sorting
trees
Collatz Conjecture
easy
recursion
math
Secret Handshake
easy
binary representation

Get started with the Elixir track. As with everything on Exercism, it's 100% free!

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